My 2021 Temperature Blanket

My first finished object for the year was my 2021 Temperature Blanket.

Way back in 2020, as the year was coming to a close and with another lockdown on the horizon, I thought about planning a craft project to keep myself busy.

I had seen many temperature blankets over the years, both knit and crochet so I thought that it would be a great project to make, a record of the daily temperature over the course of the year.

I liked the look of a knit blanket in garter stitch, lovely and squishy yet simple to work on whilst watching TV. I decided on a corner to corner blanket as I didn’t like the thought of knitting long rows every single day. So the plan was to start with a small amount of stitches at the start of the year, gradually increasing by 2 stitches daily until I get to the 2nd July (which is the midpoint of the year) when after that I would start to decrease by 2 stitches daily after that.

Next thing to decide was my temperature increments. I live in Northern Ireland so our weather is quite wet at times, it can be icy in the winter and go up to the mid 20’s (C) in the summer. I thought that if I chose a different colour or yarn for a 3’C temperature range then for 0-24’C I’d need 8 different colours.

After a bit or research I decided on the Cascade 220 Superwash DK brand. I wanted to use a 100% merino wool that was machine washable. The colours I decided on are in the table below:

Temperature OCCascade 220 Superwash colour code/name
<0-3210 deep ocean
4-6810 teal
7-91973 seafoam heather
10-12279 sterling blue
13-15282 mauve mist
16-18838 rose petal
19-21903 flamingo pink
22-24287 deep sea coral
>25263 gold fusion

I thought that 24’C would be high enough but then we actually had a heatwave during the summer so I needed another colour to cover temperatures above 24’C. After a bit of deliberation I chose colour 263 gold fusion, a lovely warm yellow.

For consistency I wanted to take note of the temperature at the same time every day so I happened upon a weather website, www.timeanddate.com . This is a fantastic website in which you can see the temperature anywhere in the world, for any date (providing they have the records). This would great to use especially if you were making a blanket as an anniversary/birthday gift for a certain year. I made a note of the daily temperature in Belfast at midday everyday and filled in a spreadsheet I had drawn up to take note of the temperatures.

So I started off the year with the dark teal colours, a cold start which knit up quickly using my 4mm Chiaogoo Red Lace circular needles.

It was a mild spring and as the blanket grew I had to switch to Lykke Driftwood wooden needles due to hand pain. The Lykke needles had a bit more grip on the stitches meaning I didn’t have to hold on to the stitches so tightly so my hand pain went.

In summer a heat wave struck and we reached a high of 28’C on 21st July.

It just got too hot to knit the blanket so I had to put to to the side for several months, however I was still taking note of the daily temperature.

I picked the blanket back up in October and did a bit more work on it but it wasn’t really until December when I worked on it solely.

31st December came and went and I still wasn’t finished but the end was in sight.

Finally I finished the blanket and had the ends sew in on 1st February.

The blanket is about 5 foot square and is actually quite heavy, it’ll keep me toasty warm.

Top left is where I started the year and the bottom right is how I ended the year. Looking at this we can see that the 2nd half of the year was very mild.

When planning this blanket I had thought it would be more teal/blue overall so I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the finished look.

So the big question is….would I make another temperature blanket? I’d have to say….no I would not. Don’t get me wrong I’m happy with the blanket and am glad that I made it but the process of recording the temperature and it taking over a year to make just weighed on me creatively and actually cost a lot big money (I don’t want to calculate how much all the wool cost). The only way I would ever make 1 again would be if it was a) a crochet blanket (quicker to work up) b) it was with acrylic yarn (it’s lighter and cheaper) c) I made it retrospectively.

So there we go, 14 months from planning to completion. Has anyone else made a temperature blanket for themselves? I’d love to see it – share a link in the comments.

I’ll hopefully catch up with you again soon.

Jean


7 thoughts on “My 2021 Temperature Blanket

  1. I think your blanket is the best temperature blanket I have seen. I love that you knitted in on the diagonal and your colors are just beautiful! I imagine it will keep you warm and it will be nice to snuggle into on a cold night or cold Sunday afternoon. I did attempt to make one a few years ago, but it was so ugly I quit after a few months. I don’t think that I would ever attempt another, but if I did, I would use your design and colors 😉

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comments. The colour placement was totally down to Mother Nature, I just chose the colours for each temperature range. ☺️

  2. Getting the temperature every single day is the reason that I have shied away from making a temperature blanket so far (I can also imagine that the yarn cost you a fortune). Nevertheless, I love your colour choices – the blanket came out so beautiful and I hope you are rightfully proud of it!!!

    1. Thank you . The website was great for getting the temperatures as I did forget on occasion so I could just go back and see what it was .

    1. I think if I did horizontal lines my tension might change over the year and Id end up with a narrower top than bottom. This way has given me a nice square.

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